Health and Safety Issues of Older Workers Surveyed in the Construction Industry

  • Sang D Choi University of Wisconsin at Whitewater
  • Douglas Rosenthal University of Wisconsin at Whitewater
  • Sampson Hauser University of Wisconsin at Whitewater

Abstract

The study aimed to gain a better understanding of age-related construction worker’s health and safety issues and discuss practical solutions to improve safety and health of the older workers in the construction industry. A two-page survey questionnaire was developed and sent out to the safety managers, directors, or coordinators in the construction firms. The participants were employed in 27 companies that employed 12,452 employees and have been in business for an average of 75 years. All of the companies had a written safety program, but only 50% of the companies represented in the survey had the Health and Wellness programs. The findings suggested that the construction industry was in fact well aware of the worker health concerns that the aging construction workforce has been facing. The survey also revealed that there was an overwhelming agreement that older workers were still very valuable to the industry. The occupational ergonomic, health and safety professionals should pay more attend to develop creative and effective health/wellness programs that any size organization can use, with the ultimate goal being to have a sustainable and healthier aging workforce in the industry. The results of other findings are also discussed in detail.

Author Biographies

Sang D Choi, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater
Professor of Occupational & Environmental Safety & Health, Director of Center for Occupational Safety and Ergonomics Research, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Douglas Rosenthal, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater
Department of Occupational & Environmental Safety & Health at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Sampson Hauser, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater
Department of Occupational & Environmental Safety & Health at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

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Published
2013-11-01
How to Cite
Choi, S. D., Rosenthal, D., & Hauser, S. (2013). Health and Safety Issues of Older Workers Surveyed in the Construction Industry. Industrial and Systems Engineering Review, 1(2), 123-131. Retrieved from http://watsonojs.binghamton.edu/index.php/iser/article/view/15